Jörg Albrecht coming to Birmingham!

A timely reminder: Don’t forget to catch our own Uwe Schütte chatting to Aston’s writer in residence Jörg Albrecht at the Birmingham Book festival on October 19th (festival programme), 7:45-9pm at the Birmingham Conservatoire, Paradise Place.

Jörg, this year’s Stadtschreiber (city writer) in Graz, Austria, will be spending the whole week at Aston, presenting his work and visiting with undergraduate students in a number of classes.

He has also been interviewed for LeftLion, the Nottingham Culture Online magazine. Here’s the intro to the interview:

“Jörg Albrecht is one of the most exciting young writers to emerge from Germany, offering unique multi-media performances and audio dramas. His latest novel Sternstaub, Goldfunk, Silberstreif (Stardust, Flash of Gold, Silver Lining, 2008) tells a fictitious history of space travel, mixing numerous allusions to popular culture with authentic details of the history of German aeronautics. In addition to this he’s written a libretto for Hanover State Opera, is currently working on a novel about the German Werewolf and runs his own theatre company, copy and waste.”

To read the interview, and to watch some of Jörg’s video art, go here.

Curious about Jörg Albrecht?

Jörg Albrecht live 

Not much longer now until we meet our new Writer in Residence, Jörg Albrecht!

He’ll be arriving in Birmingham shortly to spend a week at Aston University, working with different student groups and reading from his works, and he will also join Uwe Schütte at the Birmingham Book Festival on Oct 19th to talk about recent trends in the German literary scene, especially in Berlin.

 

If you want to get a taste of Jörg’s work in literature and multi-media art, take a look at the following vids on YouTube:

Liebe in Zeiten der Fehlermeldung

The Stranger in Me (Neulich, in der Panikothek)

sechshundert kameras und dennoch bekommt dich der movie plot

Shake Your Tree Edition Nr. 3

And the websoap “Andy Girls” by copy&waste

Currently, Jörg is Writer in Residence (Stadtschreiber) in the Austrian city of Graz. To find out more, go here.

And go here for a portrait of Jörg Albrecht review of his novel “Drei Herzen” published in Der Spiegel in 2006.

German literature at the Birmingham Book Festival!

On Tuesday, October 19, our own Uwe Schütte will introduce Birmingham to the exciting German writer Jörg Albrecht, who will talk about his work and trends in Germany’s young literary scene.

To quote the Birmingham Book Festival website:

Jörg Albrecht-phonofix

“Jörg Albrecht lives in Berlin and is one of the most exciting young writers to emerge from Germany. He writes novels and for the stage. His roots are in slam poetry, and he has produced radio plays, given multi-media performances with his band phonofix and has also written a libretto for Hanover State Opera. His latest novel Sternstaub, Goldfunk, Silberstreif was a considerable success.”

For a full festival programme, click here.

Aston orangeJörg will also spend a week at Aston as the German Writer in Residence, sponsored by the DAAD, where he will hold workshops with students and read from his published works.

To see an example of a former Writer in Residence’s work with our students, click here.

Writer in Residence 2010

JRG_AL~1

This year, Aston will welcome Jörg Albrecht as the DAAD sponsored Writer in Residence.

Jörg was born in 1981 and has received critical acclaim reputation with a number of screen plays and the two novels he has published so far.

His latest novel, Sternstaub, Goldfunk, Silberstreif (2008), is a literary account and a (popular) cultural history of the German contribution to space travel, from here to nowhere. It has been widely acclaimed as one of the most original books to emerge in German literature recently.

Writer in Residence 2009

Lorenz Schröter Lorenz Schröter

In 2009, our Writer in Residence was Lorenz Schröter: In addition to being known as a German “pioneer of pop journalism”, Lorenz has published a number of novels – Das Buch der Liebe (2007), Lucy (2002), Venuspassage (2001) etc. He has lived in Hongkong, cycled around the world, and travelled through Germany in the company of a donkey (Mein Esel Bella, 2000). His first collection of nautical trivia, Das kleine Kielschwein (2006) has been translated into 7 languages (The little book of the sea, 2007) and was followed by Das kulinarische Kielschwein (2007) and Die kleine Kielsau (2008).

Writer in Residence 2007

Jan Volker Röhnert Jan Volker Röhnert

In 2007, the award-winning German poet and writer Jan Volker Röhnert came to Aston to hold student workshop and to read from his works. He has written about the renowned German poet Rolf Dieter Brinkmann, has translated from both French and English, and has published a number of poetry collections, e.g. Metropolen (2007), Sonnenquartette (2006), Die Hingabe, endloser Kokon (2005).

In one of the workshops, a group of 1st year students created a back-translation of Jan’s poem “Nach Kenneth Koch”, inspired by Kenneth Koch’s poem “A big clown-face-shaped clowd“:

Nach Kenneth Koch Einer Wolke großes Clowngesicht

Flog eben hier vorbei

Ohne daß Dich irgend jemand sah.

Für eine Wolke ziemlich wohlgebaut

Blieben dir gerad ein paar Minuten

um zu leben.

Du sprachst etwas, oder es schien mir so:

Weit aufgesperrter Mund, der sich

Mit einer engelsgleichen Wolke unterhält

Die eilig vor ihm in die Höhe steigt.

Fußnote

Im Wagen der grünen Metrolinie, unter

dem Wort Wolke saßt

du engelsgleich und last

in einem Buch und sahst

mich an als ich lange am

Wort Wolke hing,

bis die Station erschien.

 by Jan Volker Röhnert

After Kenneth Koch  A great clown-face of a cloud

was just floating by,

without anyone even seeing you.

For a cloud you were quite substantial

but only a few minutes left to live.

You said something, or so it seemed:

wide-open mouthed, you spoke with

an angelic cloud rising swiftly up above.

Footnote

In the green line subway car

you sat angelic, beneath the CLOUD

reading page by page,

I saw your fleeting gaze,

as I sat fixed on CLOUD above

‘til the train came to a stop.

by Jan Volker Röhnert

 translated by LG1001-2